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Relating to the senses (taste, color, odor, feel). Traditional [[USDA]] meat and poultry inspection techniques are considered organoleptic because inspectors perform a variety of such procedures—involving visually examining, feeling, and smelling animal parts—to detect signs of disease or contamination. These inspection techniques are not adequate to detect [[food borne pathogens]] that are of growing concern.  
 
Relating to the senses (taste, color, odor, feel). Traditional [[USDA]] meat and poultry inspection techniques are considered organoleptic because inspectors perform a variety of such procedures—involving visually examining, feeling, and smelling animal parts—to detect signs of disease or contamination. These inspection techniques are not adequate to detect [[food borne pathogens]] that are of growing concern.  
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[[Category: Agriculture]]
 
[[Category: Agriculture]]

Latest revision as of 13:38, 21 October 2019

Relating to the senses (taste, color, odor, feel). Traditional USDA meat and poultry inspection techniques are considered organoleptic because inspectors perform a variety of such procedures—involving visually examining, feeling, and smelling animal parts—to detect signs of disease or contamination. These inspection techniques are not adequate to detect food borne pathogens that are of growing concern.

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