From WebRef.org
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "This is a phenomenon that occurs during the polar winter in which stratospheric air moves in a circular motion, with an area of relatively still air in its center. The tempera...")
 
 
Line 4: Line 4:
  
 
Source: Atmospheric Chemistry Glossary
 
Source: Atmospheric Chemistry Glossary
 +
 +
[[Category: Chemistry]]
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
<html>
 +
<script type="text/javascript">
 +
amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0";
 +
amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true";
 +
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "j5rson-20";
 +
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = "bottom";
 +
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "search";
 +
amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart";
 +
amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon";
 +
amzn_assoc_region = "US";
 +
amzn_assoc_title = "Shop Related Products";
 +
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = "chemistry";
 +
amzn_assoc_default_category = "All";
 +
amzn_assoc_linkid = "1ba5ff60b9cb0a65276bb8dd497c88ca";
 +
amzn_assoc_rows = "1";
 +
</script>
 +
<script src="//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US"></script>
 +
</html>

Latest revision as of 18:09, 13 September 2019

This is a phenomenon that occurs during the polar winter in which stratospheric air moves in a circular motion, with an area of relatively still air in its center. The temperature in the vortex is approximately -130 degrees F (-80 degrees C), which assists in the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Though usually more prolonged and colder over Antarctica, the Arctic polar vortex does form to a degree, and when the temperatures there are coldest and the vortex persists, Arctic stratospheric ozone destruction on Arctic polar stratospheric clouds has also been observed.

[Science; v251; 46-52; 1991.] [Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences; v51; 2973-2994; 1994.] [Elements: Air; Michael Allaby; page 160; 1992; Facts on File Inc; New York.] [Antarctica; Carl Eklund and Joan Beckman; page 83; 1963; Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc; New York.]

Source: Atmospheric Chemistry Glossary